The Permanent Exhibition of the Mathematisch-Physikalischer Salon

exposition permanente

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The new presentation in the Mathematisch-Physikalischer Salon allows the objects on display to be seen at such close proximity that not even the tiniest engraving or decoration goes unrevealed.
Wecker-Automatenuhr, ‘Trommelnder Bär’, um 1625.
© Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden

Entrée des visiteurs

Zwinger with Semperbau
Theaterplatz 1
01067 Dresde
Allemagne 

Musée

Mathematisch- Physikalischer Salon

en detail

THE COSMOS OF THE PRINCE
The Langgalerie, which extends from the Kronentor to the central pavilion, now houses the display on mechanical marvels and mathematical instruments from around 1600. This part of the exhibition reveals how the collection originated in the 16th-century Kunstkammer, or ‘chamber of the arts,’ of the Electors of Saxony, which was housed within the Palace at their court seat in Dresden. It explores the Electors’ intensive engagement with questions relating to measurement, surveying, and astronomy, and their enthusiasm for elaborate mechanical devices.

INSTRUMENTS OF THE ENLIGHTENMENT
The pavilion’s upper floor, the grand Festsaal, is dedicated to the history of the Salon within the Zwinger itself. Until 1945 this room housed the Salon’s entire holdings. Visitors can retrace the original idea and motives that lay behind installing a cabinet of physical instruments here in the mid-18th century. It is here that the official local time for Dresden was determined over period of 150 years and that the first systematic meteorological measurements of the region were made.

A UNIVERSE OF GLOBES
In the newly-created exhibition space within the Zwinger ramparts an array of terrestrial and celestial globes are on display from the Salon’s world-famous collection. The oldest exhibit on show here is an Islamic celestial globe dating from the 13th century. For the first time, these fragile artifacts will be able to be presented completely protected from the harmful effects of daylight.

THE COURSE OF TIME
The history of clocks, watches and automata since the Renaissance is re-told in the dramatically curving Bogengalerie. A highpoint of this part of the exhibition centers on the origins of precision watchmaking in the Saxon town of Glashütte, which the Mathematisch-Physikalischer Salon helped to found. It was here that Ferdinand Adolf Lange came up with the idea of becoming a watchmaker.

THE SALON IN THE SALON
The last section of the Bogengalerie is reserved for the Salon in the Salon. This final part of the exhibition is conceived as a place of discovery. Famous experiments from the 18th century will be performed here using exact replicas of instruments from the historic collection, including a vacuum pump and an electrostatic generator. In addition, visitors have the opportunity to try out a range of instruments for themselves, including an astrolabe and a sextant, available ‘on loan’ as reproductions.
Prix
Combined Ticket: 10,00 / 7,50 EUR/ -16 year-olds free (Zwinger with Old Masters Picture Gallery, Porcelain Collection, Royal Cabinet of Mathematical and Physical Instruments)
Porcelain Collection or Royal Cabinet: 6,00/ 4,50 EUR
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Heures d'ouvertures

dim
10:00 - 18:00
lun
-
mar
10:00 - 18:00
mer
10:00 - 18:00
jeu
10:00 - 18:00
ven
10:00 - 18:00
sam
10:00 - 18:00

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