National Museum of Anthropology

 

in short

The National Museum is the first anthropological museum that was created in Spain. Since it is an ethnographic museum, it offers the visitor an overview of the different world cultures and also provides the cultural similarities and differences that unite or separate them to highlight cultural diversity.
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© Museo Nacional de Antropología
Logo: National Museum of Anthropology

National Museum of Anthropology

in detail

The National Museum is the first anthropological museum that was created in Spain. Since it is an ethnographic museum, it offers the visitor an overview of the different world cultures and also provides the cultural similarities and differences that unite or separate them to highlight cultural diversity. The overwhelming collection of the museum is based on cultural objects from Africa, America, Asia, Europe and Oceania, and also has strong physical anthropology funds.

On 29 April 1875 King Alfonso XII opened the Anatomical Museum, although it is popularly known as the Museum of Anthropology. Its foundation was due to the physician's personal initiative Segovia Pedro Gonzalez Velasco, who invested all their savings in the building, whose architect was the Marquès of Cubas. At that time the collections were composed of objects belonging to the three "kingdoms" of nature-mineral, vegetable and animal-samples of physical anthropology and teratology, as well as antiquities and ethnographic objects, so it could be considered a typical " cabinet of curiosities. " On his death the State purchase the building and all its collections.

In 1890 the Museum of Natural Sciences takes the decision to use the old museum of Dr. Velasco as an extension of his, and in 1895 moved its Section of Anthropology, Ethnology and Prehistory, which he formed with some of the collections of Dr. Velasco, with part of the collections brought by different expeditions and scientific journeys undertaken in the last years of the nineteenth century, and with their own collections of this type was the Museum of Natural Sciences.

In 1910, through a Royal Decree, this section of the Museum of Natural Sciences, became the National Museum of Anthropology, Ethnography and Prehistory, and depending on the state. In these years was an important center of anthropology in the country and already had a large library and some laboratories, which were taught practical classes of the chair of Anthropology at the University.

In 1940, a ministerial decree, will take place the establishment of the National Museum of Ethnology. This did not mean creating a new building or a new library, but simply a different concept in the management of these. It will give more importance to the exhibition of ethnographic collections, relegated to the background of physical anthropology, depending from the time the newly created National Research Council. In 1962 will become part of the Department of Fine Arts, then declared a Historic-Artistic Monument building and collections.

The Royal Decree 684/1993 of 7 May created the National Museum of Anthropology, thereby recovering its former name, by merging the National Museum of Ethnology and the Museum of Spanish Village. This union was more administrative than real, since both institutions continued to function independently.

The final separation came in 2004, with two consecutive Royal Decrees (119/2004 and 120/2004 of 23 January). The first reorganized the National Anthropology Museum, and the second gave birth to the CIPE Costume Museum, which is assigned the collections of the former Museum of the Spanish people.

In 2004 the National Museum of Anthropology began the renovation of the permanent exhibition, first in the Africa room, and in 2005 in America and in Physical Anthropology. The current renewal responds to a new discourse of the exhibition, more in line with current scientific standards, both as anthropological museum. Thus, the previous chronological and geographical discourse has been replaced by a theme, which includes funds in areas such as clothing and adornment, music and recreational activities, beliefs, housing and household furniture, preceded by an introduction and brief notes geographical and historical. Coming soon is scheduled to address the reform of the Boards of Asia and the Philippines and Oceania, whose implementation will end in 2007.
National Museum of Anthropology
The National Museum is the first anthropological museum that is created in Spain. Since it is ethnographic museum offers the public visitor an overview of the culture of different peoples of the world and also provides the cultural similarities and differences that unite or separate them to highlight cultural diversity.
In 1940, a ministerial decree, will take place the establishment of the National Museum of Ethnology. This did not mean creating a new building or a new library, but simply a different concept in the management of these. It will give more importance to the exhibition of ethnographic collections, relegated to the background of physical anthropology, depending from the time the newly created National Research Council. In 1962 will become part of the Department of Fine Arts, then declared a Historic-Artistic Monument building and collections.

The Royal Decree 684/1993 of 7 May created the National Museum of Anthropology, thereby recovering its former name, by merging the National Museum of Ethnology and the Museum of Spanish Village. This union was more administrative than real, since both institutions continued to function independently.

The final separation came in 2004, with two consecutive Royal Decrees (119/2004 and 120/2004 of 23 January). The first reorganized the National Anthropology Museum, and the second gave birth to the CIPE Costume Museum, which is assigned the collections of the former Museum of the Spanish people.

In 2004 the National Museum of Anthropology began the renovation of the permanent exhibition, first in the Africa room, and in 2005 in America and in Physical Anthropology. The current renewal responds to a new discourse of the exhibition, more in line with current scientific standards, both as anthropological museum. Thus, the previous chronological and geographical discourse has been replaced by a theme, which includes funds in areas such as clothing and adornment, music and recreational activities, beliefs, housing and household furniture, preceded by an introduction and brief notes geographical and historical. Coming soon is scheduled to address the reform of the Boards of Asia and the Philippines and Oceania, whose implementation will end in 2007.
Admission
3,00 / 1,50 EUR Entrada gratuita los sábados después de las 14h y domingos de 10 a 15h/ Free admission: Saturdays after 2 pm and sundays from 10a.m to 3p.m
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Visitor entrance

National Museum of Anthropology
C/ Alfonso XII, 68
28014 Madrid
Spain
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Opening Times

Sun
10:00 - 15:00
Mon
-
Tue
09:30 - 20:00
Wed
09:30 - 20:00
Thu
09:30 - 20:00
Fri
09:30 - 20:00
Sat
09:30 - 20:00
Cerrado los lunes y / Closed on Monday and 1.1., 1.5., 24., 25., 31.12.

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