Musei Capitolini

 

in short

The creation of the Capitoline Museums has been traced back to 1471, when Pope Sixtus IV donated a group of bronze statues of great symbolic value to the People of Rome.
The collections are closely linked to the city of Rome, and most of the exhibits come from the city itself.


Palazzo Caffarelli Clementino
© Musei Capitolini
Logo: Musei Capitolini

Musei Capitolini

in detail

In 1471 Pope Sixtus V gave to the city a bronze collection (from Laterano) which was located in the frame of Campidoglio.
The overall layout of the collection was altered in the second half of the XVI century, when the museum acquired an important group of sculptures following Pope Pius V's decision to rid the Vatican of "pagan" images: notable works of art increased the collections thereby adding an aesthetic dimension to their hitherto generally historical nature.

With the building of the Palazzo Nuovo on the other side of the square it became possible from 1654 onwards to house in a more satisfactory manner the large collection of works that had been gathering in the Palazzo dei Conservatori, by utilising part of the new building.

The Capitoline Museum, however, was only opened to the public during the course of the following century, after the acquisition, by Pope Clement XII, of a collection of statues and portraits of Cardinal Albani. Pope Clement inaugurated the Museum in 1734.

A few decades later, in the middle of the XVIII century, Pope Benedict XIV (who was responsible for the addition of fragments of the Forma Urbis from the Age of Severus, the largest marble street-plan of ancient Rome) founded the Capitoline Picture Gallery, which saw the conflation of two important collections, the Sacchetti and the Pio.
Palazzo Caffarelli Clementino
Building work was begun by Ascanio Caffarelli in 1538 on family property situated close to the Palazzo dei Conservatori; it was completed after 1680.
The building looked out onto the courtyard of the Palazzo dei Conservatori while its interior included two gardens - (the Caffarelli Garden and that known as the Roman Garden); the large portal on the Via delle Tre Pile was the main entrance to the property.
Over the centuries the palazzo has undergone a number of alterations which have substantially modified its original appearance. Some remaining parts of the frescoed vaulted ceiling are now housed in the Museum of Rome.
From the beginning of the 19th century till the end of the First World War the building was occupied by the Prussian Embassy.
In 1918 it was taken back by the Rome City Council and partially demolished. A large terrace, (the Caffarelli Terrace) took the place of the upper floors in the Eastern wing, while the ground floor, which had been partially obliterated by excavations into the Temple of Capitoline Jupiter, was taken over by the new museum section (Mussolini Museum, subsequently the Museo Nuovo).
Admission
intero € 12,00 ridotto € 10,00 Adults € 12,00 Reduced € 10,00 La biglietteria chiude un'ora prima/ The ticket office closes an hour in advance.
Palazzo dei Conservatori
The building known as Palazzo dei Conservatori, seat of an elected magistrature which had the task of administering the city, goes back to the middle of the 15th century. The building originally featured a portico on the ground floor and Guelf-cross windows on the first floor, in addition to a row of small windows on the mezzanine floor.
Michelangelo re-designed the facade, adding gigantic Corinthian pilaster strips on high pedestals, flanked by pillars in the portico on the ground floor. As in the case of Palazzo Senatorio, the building was crowned with a balustrade and statues.
The transformation of the building also affected its interior configuration, as a result of alterations to the windows on the first floor. The central one was eventually created by Giacomo della Porta and is much larger than the others, making an exception to Michelangelo's plan.
Admission
intero € 12,00 ridotto € 10,00 Adults € 12,00 Reduced € 10,00 La biglietteria chiude un'ora prima / The ticket office closes an hour in advance.
Palazzo Nuovo
Palazzo Nuovo was built in the XVII century under the guidance of Girolamo Rainaldi and his son Carlo.
Its slanting orientation, which imitates that of Palazzo dei Conservatori opposite, was influenced by a pre-existing retaining wall on the heights of S. Maria in Aracoeli, in the centre of which was a fountain with a statue known as "Marforio", later moved to the courtyard of the Capitoline Museum.
Externally, the new building is identical to Palazzo dei Conservatori, while the well-conserved decoration of the symmetrically-planned interior features gilded wooden coffering on the first floor.
Admission
intero € 12,00 ridotto € 10,00 Adults € 12,00 Reduced € 10,00 La biglietteria chiude un'ora prima/ The ticket office closes an hour in advance.
Palazzo Senatorio
Built in the XII century on the remains of the ancient Tabularium and utilising pre-existing fortifications built by powerful baronial families, this palazzo makes up the background to the piazza. It owes its name to its function as senatorial seat responsible for the administration of justice.
In 1299 an open loggia was added overlooking the piazza, although this was walled in a century later in order to strengthen the Palazzo, which was turned into a fortress with the addition of towers by Pope Boniface IX; more corner towers were later added by Popes Martin V and Nicholas V.
Michelangelo also designed a monumental double-flighted staircase for the Palazzo Senatorio, in addition to dividing up the façade with gigantic pilaster strips, large windows and tympanums and a crowning balustrade featuring statues.
The work was completed after his death by Giacomo della Porta, who made some alterations to Michelangelo's plan. The bell-tower was also the result of an alteration to the original plan, this time by Martino Longhi the Elder.
Admission
intero € 12,00 ridotto € 10,00 Adults € 12,00 Reduced € 10,00 La biglietteria chiude un'ora prima/ The ticket office closes an hour in advance.
The museum on google maps:

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Visitor entrance

Palazzo Caffarelli Clementino
Piazza del Campidoglio, 1
00186 Rome
Italy
view on a map

Opening Times

Sun
09:00 - 20:00
Mon
-
Tue
09:00 - 20:00
Wed
09:00 - 20:00
Thu
09:00 - 20:00
Fri
09:00 - 20:00
Sat
09:00 - 20:00
La biglietteria chiude un'ora prima.
The ticket office closes an hour in advance.

Visitor entrance

Palazzo dei Conservatori
Piazza del Campidoglio, 1
00186 Rome
Italy
view on a map

Opening Times

Sun
09:00 - 20:00
Mon
-
Tue
09:00 - 20:00
Wed
09:00 - 20:00
Thu
09:00 - 20:00
Fri
09:00 - 20:00
Sat
09:00 - 20:00
La biglietteria chiude un'ora prima.
The ticket office closes an hour in advance.

Visitor entrance

Palazzo Nuovo
Piazza del Campidoglio, 1
00186 Rome
Italy
view on a map

Opening Times

Sun
09:00 - 20:00
Mon
-
Tue
09:00 - 20:00
Wed
09:00 - 20:00
Thu
09:00 - 20:00
Fri
09:00 - 20:00
Sat
09:00 - 20:00
La biglietteria chiude un'ora prima.
The ticket office closes an hour in advance.

Visitor entrance

Palazzo Senatorio
Piazza del Campidoglio,1
00186 Rome
Italy
view on a map

Opening Times

Sun
09:00 - 20:00
Mon
-
Tue
09:00 - 20:00
Wed
09:00 - 20:00
Thu
09:00 - 20:00
Fri
09:00 - 20:00
Sat
09:00 - 20:00
La biglietteria chiude un'ora prima.
The ticket office closes an hour in advance.

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