Museum of Decorative Arts

 

in short

The museum’s collections are on display at two different locations: a broad overview of European applied arts and design from the Middle Ages to the present can be found at the Kulturforum at Potsdamer Platz, while Renaissance, Baroque and Rococo interiors can be seen at the new outpost in Köpenick.
Kunstgewerbemuseum, Kulturforum Potsdamer Platz
© Staatliche Museen zu Berlin. Foto: Maximilian Meisse
Logo: Museum of Decorative Arts

Museum of Decorative Arts

in detail

The Museum of Decorative Arts has its origins in the German Arts and Crafts Museum Association of Berlin, which was founded in 1867.

The museum collects works of skilled craftsmanship, ranging from post-antiquity to the present. It encompasses all the styles and periods in art history and includes silks and costumes, tapestries, decorative wainscots and furniture, vessels made of glass, enamel and porcelain, works in silver and gold as well as contemporary crafts and design objects. Most of the materials involved are of great value. Many items were commissioned by representatives of the church, the royal court and members of the aristocracy.

MUSEUM OF DECORATIVE ARTS AT THE KULTURFORUM

A tour of the spacious building at the Kulturforum takes visitors through 7,000 square metres of exhibition room revealing the historical development and great variety of applied arts and crafts from the Middle Ages through to Art Nouveau and up to the present day.

Treasures from medieval churches, including the famous Guelf Treasure (Welfenschatz) and the 'Baptismal font of Emperor Barbarossa' illustrate the excellent skills of goldsmiths at that time, as does the representational silverware, which once belonged to councillors of the wealthy town of Lüneburg.

On the ground floor, the highly sophisticated lifestyle at the courts of Italian nobles during the Renaissance is highlighted with examples of bronzes, tapestries, furniture, Venetian glass and decorated glazed earthenware (majolica). The upper floor is reserved for the treasures from cabinets of curiosities and baroque art collections: faience work and glass from central European courts as well as the homes of patricians, Meissen and Berlin porcelain, sophisticated pieces of furniture, decorative tableware and accessories ranging from rococo and classicism to historicism and Art Nouveau.

The acquisition of the Kamer/Ruf collection has added anotherfocus in the field of fashion.

The lower ground floor contains the so-called New Collection where arts and crafts of the twentieth century are complemented by examples of industrial products, which are far more dominant in modern life than hand-made objects.

MUSEUM OF DECORATIVE ARTS AT KÖPENICK PALACE
Built between 1677 and 1689 in Baroque style, the palace first became a museum in 1963. After the division of Germany, the National Museums in Berlin used it as exhibition space for those parts of the Museum of Decorative Arts’ collection which had remained in East Berlin. In 1994, basic restoration work began on the building.

At Köpenick Palace, a new museum concept is devised: under the heading ‘RoomArt’, furniture and decorative art from the Renaissance, Baroque and Rococo periods are jointly presented. Over 500 exhibits are on display, selected according to the original function the objects fulfilled within the 16th, 17th and 18th century culture of habitation and representation in the public, private and courtly spheres. The term ‘RoomArt’ embraces all parts of the interior which in the past served as wall and room decorations in bourgeois and courtly dwelling rooms: tapestries, enamel works, panelling, leather hangings, a cabinet with Baroque cupboards from the Kunstkammer, centrepieces, porcelain and silver. After careful restoration, the ceiling paintings and the stucco ceilings created by Graubünden masters – a total of 29 – are also included in the new presentation concept.

One of the highlights of the tour of the palace are four remarkably complete walk-in panellings from the above mentioned periods, among them the richly inlaid Renaissance panelling from Haldenstein Palace in Switzerland and Höllrich Palace, further the silver buffet from Berlin Palace and the recreated so-called ‘coat of arms hall’.

The Baroque truss is an exceptional technical monument. This space is used for the presentation of the study collection of metal instruments, faience, glass and porcelain. The basement, including the remains of the imposing north-eastern tower of the preceding building, houses an exhibition on the history of settlement and architectural development on the palace island. The extensive range of visitor services is rounded off by multimedia facilities offering details on the architecture of the palace and the collection, a reading room and, last not least, the palace café, idyllically located on the banks of the river.
Schloss Köpenick
Das 1677-83 von R. van Langervelt erbaute Schloss diente seit 1963 als Kunstgewerbemuseum der Staatlichen Museen zu Berlin.
Die ursprünglichen hochbarocken Raumdekorationen sind vor allem mit Stuckdecken teilweise erhalten. Am eindrucksvollsten sind sie in dem reich ausgemalten "Wappensaal" zu erleben.
Admission
Standard: 6,00 EUR / Reduced: 3,00 EUR
The museum on google maps:

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Visitor entrance

Museum of Decorative Arts
Matthäikirchplatz 6
10785 Berlin
Germany
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Opening Times

Sun
11:00 - 18:00
Mon
-
Tue
10:00 - 18:00
Wed
10:00 - 18:00
Thu
10:00 - 18:00
Fri
10:00 - 18:00
Sat
11:00 - 18:00

Visitor entrance

Köpenick Palace
Schlossinsel 1
12557 Berlin
Germany
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Opening Times

Sun
11:00 - 17:00
Mon
-
Tue
-
Wed
-
Thu
11:00 - 17:00
Fri
11:00 - 17:00
Sat
11:00 - 17:00
April - September: Tues - Sun (Di - So) 11:00 - 18:00
October - March: Thu - Sun (Do - So) 11:00 - 17:00

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